All About Mia by Lisa Williamson // second book syndrome? Not a chance

I finally got to read All About Mia by Lisa Williamson! (What? I have a very busy TBR). I’ve now read five of my most anticipated reads of the year (and about to start a sixth), which I am totally pleased with. Anyway, on with the review!

326157251Author(s): Lisa Williamson
Publisher:
 David Fickling Books
Publication date: 2 February 2017
Category: YA
Genre(s): contemporary
Series or standalone?: standalone
Source: purchased
Find on Goodreads and The Book Depository

One family. Three sisters.

Grace is the oldest and a straight-A student. Audrey is the youngest, a future Olympic swimming champion. And Mia? Mia is the the mess in the middle.

Mia is wild and daring, great with hair and selfies, and probably more popular than both her sisters put together – though these are not attributes appreciated by her parents or teachers. When Grace makes a shock announcement, Mia is almost relieved: finally someone else will bear the brunt of her parents’ high expectations and constant nagging. But instead, it’s Mia whose life spirals out of control – boozing, boys and bad behaviour – and who might put at risk the very things she loves the most.

From the author of one of 2015’s breakout débuts – The Art of Being Normal, a contemporary which won critical acclaim, garnered serious award credentials and swept many into the clamour of a new UKYA favourite – comes one of my most anticipated reads of 2017: Lisa Williamson’s rambunctious, remarkable second novel, All About Mia.

I loved the premise of this book. It’s just the kind of chunky, get-stuck-into-it contemporary UKYA I’ve been looking for. It has such a strong, big-hearted feel: it’s down-to-earth, chaotic, candid and entertaining. I think ‘realistic’ is a very overused word when it comes to YA, but if interesting characters, believable struggles and strong writing count, then All About Mia fits the bill.

Sixteen-year-old Mia Campbell-Richardson is sandwiched between Cambridge-bound Grace (‘Mother Teresa in a blazer’) and future Olympic swimmer Audrey (occasionally known as Nemo). Mia, however, isn’t academic or sporty, doesn’t have any kooky hobbies, and hasn’t got a clue what she wants to do with her life. She may be a selfie queen and the undisputed leader of her friends, but inside she feels constantly shown up by her high-achieving siblings. Where Grace and Audrey excel, Mia fails spectacularly; where her parents plaster her sisters’ successes all over the walls, Mia gets a handful of embarrassing photographs and constant reminders of the trouble she’s caused. When straight-A student Grace comes home early from her gap year and drops a bombshell, Mia hopes that her now-not-so-perfect sister will get the comeuppance she deserves – the kind of reprimand she’s been used to for years. But her parents’ ire is conspicuously absent, and what’s worse, Mia finds herself on a downward spiral that can mean only one thing: trouble.

This character-driven novel is at turns fun, frank and vivid. With their parents finally about to marry after a twenty-year engagement, Grace’s life turning upside down (and boyfriend Sam taking up what little space there is left in the house), Audrey adapting to strict training under a new coach and Mia muddling her way through one disaster after another, you could say that the Campbell-Richardson household is a little bit busy. These core characters are vibrant, flawed and brilliant, and I’d definitely read a spin-off about Audrey.

Messy, mouthy Mia is a force to be reckoned with. Resigned to being the family disappointment, her struggle to be seen in the shadow of her overachieving sisters is written in a deeply empathetic way. Williamson doesn’t underestimate her audience, either: it’s the reader who will notice first that Mia’s behaviour is immature and attention-seeking, but also the reader who will first empathise with her. Shallow and impulsive, she does some unlikeable things, but particularly in the early half of the book, her heart’s on every page. I loved some of the little details: her passion, her intelligence, Miss Linden’s belief in and kind words for her making all the difference.

In a move which should please YA fans looking for reads without a romance-orientated plot, Mia doesn’t have a love interest. However, this ploy is perhaps taken a little too literally as all of Mia’s romantic and physical experiences are unhealthy and the book is far more sex-negative than sex-positive. Secondary relationships for Mia’s loved-up parents and sister Grace with boyfriend Sam bring a touch of warmth and buoyance – though as we see both through Mia’s cringing perspective one can’t help but feel there’s a bit of ‘ick’ to them!

Unfortunately, the friendships which appear in Mia’s life needed more depth. Authors like Sara Barnard and Holly Bourne have set the bar high when it comes to friendship in recent YA, creating resonant, genuine platonic relationships between their prose teenagers, and what’s more, pointing out that many YA friendships which have come before have been cursory at best. The first half of the book is engaging and often hilarious but the second half is weighed down by unnecessary plot points and scenes which drag before a dramatic and satisfying climax finally breaks through and the book gets back on track. All About Mia shines brightest when the tight-knit, loving, ever-so-slightly dysfunctional Campbell-Richardsons take centre stage.

4hstars-fw

Messy, outrageous, vivid and engaging, All About Mia boasts a brilliant premise and some great flashes of humour. A solid cast and a satisfying style are marred only by a few duff or unnecessary turns of plot. A blistering and lively contemporary standalone ideal for fans of Trouble by Non Pratt, All of the Above by Juno Dawson or Lobsters by Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison.

nametag2-fw

Advertisements

One thought on “All About Mia by Lisa Williamson // second book syndrome? Not a chance

  1. Pingback: Most Anticipated Reads of 2017 – July Check In! | the paper alchemist

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s