The Girl’s Guide To Summer by Sarah Mlynowski // a rare mishap from Mlynowski

31199783Author(s): Sarah Mlynowski
Publisher:
 Orchard Books
Publication date: 15th June 2017
Category: YA/NA
Genre(s): contemporary
Series or standalone?: series (possibly? maybe? idek)
Source: I received a NetGalley copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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Nineteen-year-old Sydney has the perfect summer mapped out. She’s spending the next four and half weeks traveling through Europe with her childhood best friend, Leela. Their plans include the Eiffel Tower, eating gelato, and making out with très hot strangers. Her plans do not include Leela’s cheating ex-boyfriend showing up on the flight to London, falling for the cheating ex-boyfriend’s très hot friend, monitoring a delicate home life via texts, or feeling like the rope in a friendship tug-of-war.

As Sydney zigzags through Switzerland, Italy, the Netherlands and France, she must learn when to hold on, when to keep moving, and when to jump into the Riviera…wearing only her polka dot underpants.

An experienced author of fiction for both adults and teens, Sarah Mlynowski can usually be relied upon to deliver fun, funky novels with a familiar, highly readable style. And in many ways, such traits are true of The Girl’s Guide to Summer (titled in some countries as I See London, I See France). It’s entertaining, fairly light-hearted and clearly designed as an untaxing, read-while-you-hold-a-brightly-coloured-drink-with-a-tiny-umbrella-in-one-hand beach read. The premise is straightforward and will appeal to the summer YA crowd. For fans of Luisa Plaja and Deb Caletti, it’s an absorbing and modern (namely in its persistent references to things like Instagram, which will no doubt see it quickly become dated) new release.

When long-time best friend Leela’s unexpected break-up sees her offered a spare plane ticket and the chance to backpack around Europe for a month, teenager Sydney, who hasn’t taken a break from her studies or from being her mom’s carer in years, can’t resist. Unfortunately, Leela’s ex-boyfriend Matt has decided to go backpacking anyway, and within days it becomes clear that they have unfinished emotional business of the tongue-tennis kind to take care of, leaving Sydney to play gooseberry – or get to know Matt’s mysterious (and, as she frequently reminds us, surprisingly hot) friend, Jackson. What unfolds is the story of a girl learning to navigate new continents, secret romances, thorny relationships, and the London Tube with, shall we say, varying levels of success.

The Girl’s Guide to Summer is frothy, sometimes even funny, stuff. Organised, put-together Sydney is there for her friends and family, whether that’s guiding drunk friends to the bathroom or checking up on her mother from thousands of miles away, but with temperamental Leela veering from loved-up to heartbroken at the drop of a hat and constantly placing demands on her attention, readers will likely feel she’s allowing herself to be pulled about a bit too often. Both meet other backpackers on their travels, including some particularly exuberant Australians, but I would’ve liked to have seen a more balanced, mutually beneficial friendship take up the core of the book. Her resident Paris friend, Kat, also gets plenty of time on the page but where emotional depth should appear alongside her confidence, she’s defined mostly by Sex and the City levels of brassy materialism. Sydney’s romance with outgoing, handsome Jackson, meanwhile, is certainly aiming for swoony – but one can’t help feeling it’s a little shallow, as after some initial back-and-forth Sydney spends most of the book specifying only her attraction to him while meaningful conversation is glossed over.

And, perhaps most crucially, while this book is being marketed as YA, specifically to Mlynowski’s YA audience, it is not YA. It’s something resembling NA (the once-popular ‘New Adult’ category), with a touch more added for some attempt at a half-hearted transition. There’s heavy drinking, drug use and (apparently in place of taking more than one or two opportunities to explore themes in a thoughtful, interesting way) a scene entirely set at a live sex show in Amsterdam. The protagonists’ travels around Europe rely on super generalised stereotypes, the relationships lack depth, serious themes aren’t particularly thoroughly handled and the ending is completely rushed, leaving little room for wrapping up details or any narrative conclusion.

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For fans of Keris Stainton and Deb Caletti, The Girl’s Guide to Summer is entertaining but ultimately ill-categorised. I expected more from the author of Ten Things We Did (And Probably Shouldn’t Have) and Don’t Even Think About It. 

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