Guest Post // NaNoWriMo Tarot with Deirdre Sullivan!

9781912417117Today on the blog, a little something different: a tarot reading! In this guest post in celebration of the paperback release of her acclaimed fairytale retelling collection Tangleweed and Brine (pictured in its inky Sunday best here), fabulous writer and (tarot) reader Deirdre Sullivan agreed to take a look at her beautiful cards for a very timely purpose.  

If you’re feeling stuck with National Novel Writing Month, maybe it’s time to see if the cards have any guidance for you…

NaNoWriMo is upon us and, while I’m not participating this year, I’m very fond of it. Needlework (Little Island, 2016) was a NaNoWriMo book, as was Perfectly Preventable Deaths (out in June 2019 from Hot Key). While both of those books needed considerable redrafting before they were ready to share with people, the power of letting yourself be consumed by story for a month is something I found really liberating and satisfying.

A tool I use in my creative writing workshops and in my own practice is the tarot. For me, the tarot is largely a tool for self-reflection. I use it to tap into my own intuition. The seventy-eight cards represent different facets and truths of the human experience, and can work extremely well for a writer stuck on character development, or a story’s narrative arc.

For my reading today, I chose the Tattoo Tarot by Diana McMahon Collis and Megamunden. I like the design of this deck a lot, but I bought it mainly to use as a resource for workshop exercises. I’m going to do a simple four card spread, which I like because it’s very no nonsense – it has helped me to give myself a bit of tough love in recent times, as deadlines loomed and I needed to get the head down. Here goes!

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Card One: It deals with this.

Four of Pentacles is a card usually to do with money, and control. Pentacles is earth. Four as a number is generally to do with stability and structure. 1,167 words of structure a day, to be precise.

Participating in NaNoWriMo is exerting that control – that discipline over yourself in pursuit of a tangible achievement, something you can touch. It’s turning something in your head into something on the page. Hoarding words like gold coins until you hit that target. A singular focus, and the sacrifices that implies.

There are things you will have to say no to this month, experiences you’ll have to forgo in favour of spending time with the people in your brain. Will it be worth it?

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Card Two: Don’t do this.

The Seven of Swords. This is a card of warning, and my lucky number – seven. This can be the number of imbalance on the journey, a twist in the road where you need to pause and ask for directions. But NaNoWriMo is not a pausing time. Swords as a suit represent air, the intellectual.

What all these knives are saying to me, is don’t stop to edit your work. Just keep going. You can be brutal later, when you have a draft to fix. Don’t stop and count all the problems with your writing, all the swords thrust into your soft, growing heart. Of course there will be problems with it, things to fix, but it’s still worth your time right now.

Write with your heart, not with a scalpel. Get to 50,000. Have a nap.

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Card Three: Do this.

Nine of Wands. Wands are the suit of fire, of urgency and passion. They are your fingers banging against the keyboard, tattooing out a rhythm while you live the words you write. Nine is the number of hanging in there. Of almost.

You will need to move quickly during NaNoWriMo: there will be obstacles, days when you don’t get the chance to write for as long or as much as you want to, evenings when your characters won’t behave or your brain can’t work out how to fix a plot hole. During NaNoWriMo there’s a lot to be said for leaving it and moving on to the next thing. Nothing wrong with just typing IMPORTANT CONVERSATION THAT CHANGES EVERYTHING GOES HERE, and then writing the next thing.

It doesn’t have to be perfect yet, it just has to be. Also, this can be a card of recovery, so don’t forget to back your work up every single day.

Card Four: It leads to this.

The Ace of Cups. An actual golden trophy. Kind of on the nose. I LOVE this card.

It’s a card of creativity and imagination, of beginnings. Literally brimming with potential and satisfaction. This is what having a first draft down gives you. You have written a book. Now, all you have to do is make it better, or write the next one. Once you have done the thing, you know that you can do it again and again. Your cup is full, the sun is shining, there’s two little bird dudes basking in the glory of it.

It feels good, when you hit that 50K.
It feels like an achievement.
And it is.

——

If you like the idea of using tarot for creative purposes, there are plenty of spreads and blog posts available to look at online (I love Little Red Tarot and Biddy Tarot!). Book-wise it’s worth having a look at Jessa Crispin’s The Creative Tarot, which marries tarot and developing a piece of work really nicely. I also like Tarot Plain and Simple by Anthony Louis, and The Tarot Dictionary by Jana Riley for reference.

Happy NaNoWriMo, and if you don’t hit that target, it’s not the end of the world. Tangleweed and Brine is only 26,000 words long. It takes the space it takes to tell a story.
Best of luck.

author-3Deirdre Sullivan is an award-winning writer from Galway, Ireland. Her young adult novel Needlework won the Honour Award for Fiction at the Children’s Books Ireland Awards and was shortlisted for the Irish Book Awards. Her Primrose Leary series was also widely acclaimed; two of the Prim books were shortlisted for the Children’s Books Ireland awards, while the third, Primperfect, was shortlisted for the European Prize for Literature.

Deirdre also writes short fiction and poetry, which has been published in places like The Penny Dreadful and The Dublin Review. When Deirdre is not writing she is a reader and a guinea pig enthusiast, and shares her home with a very important cat named Arthur Conan Doyle.

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Event Round Up: We Love YA! DeptCon at ILFD

As you can see from my past event round-ups, DeptCon has become something of a staple in the Irish YA scene.

“But Arianne,” you whisper, aghast, “doesn’t DeptCon usually take place in… October?”

Yes, it does! This year, however, there was SURPRISE appearance from the DeptCon squad with their summertime We Love YA! event as part of the ongoing International Literature Festival. There were three panels plus signings, and I was lucky enough to attend (and bring back all the deets for you).

“Writing myself into this country”: Muhammad Khan, Emma Quigley and Mary Watson talk ‘New Voices’, chaired by Shane Hegarty 

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L-R: Shane Hegarty, Mary Watson, Emma Quigley, Muhammad Khan

The first panel, themed around the idea of ‘New Voices’, featured three debut YA writers (though Watson is an award-winning South African writer for adults, The Wren Hunt is her first book for teenagers). Hegarty’s questions drew answers on inspirations, writing routines, what they’d be working on next, and more.

Muhammad Khan’s biggest influence has been his time as a maths teacher and tutor in a school where most students are from BAME backgrounds. His students contributed to drafts of what became I Am Thunder, inspiring everything from Muzna’s shyness to the fact that he had the book’s cover artist thicken her eyebrows so that they’d be suitably “on fleek”! He decided to tackle themes like radicalisation and racism in YA partly because of the UK government’s Prevent strategy, which he realised was causing students to clam up in case their questions or experiences got them into trouble. His advice for young writers: “Write a book that you want to write…. don’t follow trends, because by the time you finish your book that trend will be over”. He’s currently working on another contemporary featuring different characters, exploring toxic masculinity ‘through the eyes of a very gentle boy’.

Emma Quigley’s début Bank (out from Little Island Books) is the comedy-drama story of a group of teen boys who decide to start money-lending to classmates, only to make a series of increasingly risky investments as their plans begin to unravel. Quigley wanted to write about friendships between teenage boys but also ended up mirroring twenty-first century financial crises. She spoke about how her son was a reader who often said his friends weren’t – she wanted to write something that would appeal to that drop-off point of readership, and Bank actually sounds really exciting! It was also revealed that her son wrote the tagline for the book: “Lunch money just got serious”!

Mary Watson became fascinated by the Irish tradition of the wren hunt – in which a real or stand-in wren is chased and hunted on St. Stephen’s Day (the day after Christmas Day) – after moving to Ireland from South Africa. She wanted to write a book that she could only have written here, even though The Wren Hunt is technically a fantasy or magical realism novel, full of “quiet magic, everyday magic”. She cited Diana Wynne Jones as an influence and spoke with real feeling about the wealth of African literature that doesn’t always make it to mainstream audiences in the Anglosphere. Watson’s was the only book I’d read of the three before the panel, but I think the discussion did its job because by the end of it I was so intrigued by I Am Thunder and Bank.

“The nineties were dull as dishwater”: Brian Conaghan, Derek Landy and Katherine Webber in ‘Nerd Alert!’, chaired by David O’Callaghan

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L-R: Katie Webber, David O’Callaghan, Brian Conaghan, Derek Landy

Most literary festival panels (naturally) focus on the literary side of life, but this panel was more about pop culture and what it meant to three writers growing up. They talked about the extent to which you can make pop culture references in a book but otherwise concentrated on beloved films, TV and music. There was a lot of love for the ’80s, but most of the ’90s  love was for Webber’s Wing Jones, which is set in 1996 Atlanta – read more about it here!).

Katherine Webber can quote much of Clueless; Conaghan made an impassioned speech on behalf of Grease and declared his belonging to a small global cult following of its much-maligned sequel; Derek Landy apparently owns half the prop department of multiple comic book adaptations, including the original Superman costume and cape. Katie credits Sailor Moon (only half-jokingly) with piquing her interest in Asian culture – she later studied Japanese, then Chinese, and moved to Hong Kong to study. Conaghan was into eternally cool bands, while Webber is an unashamed pop fan.

The conversation returned to literature to discuss favourite childhood books. Katie loves A Wrinkle in Time so much that it featured in at least three different ways at her wedding (shoutout to husband and Sam Wu co-writer Kevin Tsang for highest number of cameo mentions), while Landy commented on the past dearth of YA which once meant going straight from children’s books to crime fiction. Perhaps most interestingly, Brian Conaghan was frank about the fact that he was 17 when he first read a novel and had a reading age of 12 when he was 16, partly due to lack of access to a library or books at school. I so admired Conaghan’s work on We Come Apart and really appreciated someone pointing out that not all readers or writers come to books in the same way.

“I always felt like a changeling. I never felt like I belonged”: Louise O’Neill and Deirdre Sullivan talk ‘Dark Fairytales’, chaired by Elaina Ryan 

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L-R: Elaina Ryan, Louise O’Neill, Deirdre Sullivan, wearing ‘Repeal’ gear

There was something of a uniform for this event on feminist retellings of fairytales. Both Louise O’Neill and Deirdre Sullivan have recently released fairytale retellings: O’Neill’s The Surface Breaks takes on The Little Mermaid, while Sullivan’s Tangleweed and Brine is a collection of twelve short stories which draw on not just The Little Mermaid but fairytales like Rapunzel and Sleeping Beauty (you can read more about the book here!).

This was the only panel in which the authors were asked to read from their books, which was a fantastic way to introduce or reintroduce the audience to the stories in question. It was O’Neill’s first time reading from The Surface Breaks at an event (she read a scene featuring a character called Sadhbh, a name she insisted on because “the English find it very confusing and I find that very amusing”).  Tangleweed and Brine is almost like prose poetry, making it chillingly effective when read aloud. Both books are quite dark – but that’s because, as O’Neill and Sullivan pointed out, the source fairytales are also quite dark. The Little Mermaid’s original ending at the hands of Hans Christian Anderson, for example, is incredibly unsettling.

There was plenty of talk about that most famous of fairytale strains, the Disney film, but it’s not all bad – there was definite agreement that movies like Frozen and Moana have appreciably feminist moments (in Elaina Ryan’s immortal words on Moana: “she seems like good craic”). And indeed, it is the complicated, sometimes sanitised history of the fairytale that seems to provide such scope for feminist reinterpretation, as both Louise and Deirdre would write another fairytale retelling if they had the chance. O’Neill would love to get her hands on Beauty and the Beast, while Sullivan would like to pair the ‘earth and water’ theme of Tangleweed and Brine with another collection on what I thought would just be ‘air and fire’ but was actually termed the far more poetic ‘breath and ember’.

So there you have it! Did you attend this edition of DeptCon? Have you read any of the books mentioned? Are any of them on your TBR?

 

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Flying Tips for Flightless Birds by Kelly McCaughrain // début leaps – and sticks the landing

Today on the blog, we’re taking to the trapeze with this début novel…

ftipsAuthor(s): Kelly McCaughrain
Publisher: Walker Books
Publication date: 1st March 2018
Genre: contemporary
Category:
upper MG, teen fiction
Series or standalone?: standalone
Source: own
Find on Goodreads and The Book Depository

Teenage twins Finch and Birdie Franconi are stars of the flying trapeze. Circus tricks are practically in their blood.

But when Birdie suffers a terrifying accident, Finch must team up with the geeky new kid, Hector, to create an all-boys double act and save the family circus school. Teetering on the high-wire that is school social hierarchy while juggling the demands of family, first love and facing up to who they are is a lot for two confused clowns to handle. Will their friendship, and the circus, survive?

Flying Tips for Flightless Birds was another of those pleasant surprises in my spring reading this year. It’s again from that spot between fiction for older children and for early teens (11-14s), making it particularly suited to those looking to take more steps into the YA section. There was a spate of circus books in YA in 2017, but they all seemed to have a supernatural – Caraval by Stephanie Garber, The Pack by Kate Ormand – or dark thriller edge – Show Stopper by Hayley Barker, even Flight of a Starling by Lisa Heathfield, which is also about a trapeze double act and a new acquaintance who alters two siblings’ lives – but with Flying Tips for Flightless Birds, Kelly McCaughrain manages to draw together both storytellers’ evident fascination with the circus and a much-needed lightness of touch.

When trapeze artists Finchley and Bridget Sullivan are in the air, they become Finch and Birdie Franconi, the latest in a long line of circus performers, including high wire walkers, barrel riders, jugglers (and one very health and safety conscious dad). While their ancestors flung themselves over Niagara Falls and travelled the world, their parents have opted to run a circus school just outside Belfast – though it still means having a mother who can tightrope walk, a little brother who wants to be a fire eater and a foul-mouthed grandmother, Lou, who used to walk across the ridges of roofs to freak out the neighbours.

Birdie and Finch have inherited a taste for daring. They dress flamboyantly and find themselves subconsciously juggling nearby objects during everyday conversation. But with Birdie starting to wonder if there could be life outside the circus and Finch struggling in her absence, they are believable. New boy Hector is enthusiastic but clumsy; at first the student of a reluctant Finch, his friendship becomes invaluable, and I really liked the exploration of their changing relationship. Elsewhere in the cast, there’s Freddie, known as Py (“Fire dancer, fire juggler – you name it, I’ll put lighter fluid on it”) and Janie, a foster kid and aerialist who’s so good at dangling from reams of silk she finds it calming.

McCaughrain’s prose is straightforward and fairly unshowy, though she conjures evocative details – the thrill of heights, the calluses on circus performers’ hands, even sitting in the safety net beneath the trapeze to get your breath back – and handles setting with subtlety, focusing on the circus warehouse as an adopted home for its eclectic residents. Finch’s narration cleverly interspersed with distinctive blog posts from Birdie, and there are moments of incisiveness (“Be that as it may” is “adult for ‘whatever'”; there’s “something lonely about an empty spotlight, like a big white hole in the world”). One of her major themes is what it means to stand out, but she also touches on things like found family and school struggles. She balances not-unrealistic elements of homophobia with quite a sweet coming-out story, too.

On the downside, there’s little urgency or pace to an already fairly standard plot, though it revolves around what you’d expect to be quite an urgent matter, that is, trying to save the circus school from closing. Some of the conflict gets resolved with very little action from the protagonists. I would’ve liked there to have been more actual trapeze scenes in the first half – we often hear more about it than see it take place – and there’s almost no character depth or development to Birdie and Finch’s other siblings, leaving them effectively faceless for the length of the book.

However, the most surprising feature of Flying Tips for Flightless Birds for me was its sense of humour. That was what kept me reading, whether it was in lively asides (“We’ve put a lot of effort into taming Jay, but we think it’s unfair to do it to more intelligent creatures”), mining humour from strife (“the only difference between a playground punch-up in Year Eight and one in Year Eleven is that everyone’s a bit taller and has better hair”), or quips in dialogue (Finch’s parents on marriage: “Ah, crap, I knew there was something we forgot to do.” “Do you think we should return all those gifts?”). It livened up the prose and turned this solid début into a really enjoyable one.

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Flying Tips for Flightless Birds is unexpectedly funny, often enjoyable and, at its best, oddly moving. This is a début which juggles the sweet and the sombre, and is ideal for 11-14 readers. I’m intrigued to see what McCaughrain writes next. 

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20 Things I Learned at DeptCon3

As some of you may know, I attended DeptCon3 (Ireland’s largest YA book convention) again this year! As well as having lots of bookish chats and bumping into various folk from the book world, (there seriously wasn’t enough time for even half of the cool conversations to be had), wearing delightfully vampy nails and only nearly tripping up the stairs twice, I took lots of detailed notes – so many I can barely decipher them, and have decided to do a round-up made of highlights and fun moments instead!

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image courtesy @Dept51

Maggie Harcourt’s top priority when it comes to writing is being near the biscuit tin. Her assertion that bourbons are the best writing biscuit, however, was more controversial…

If there’s one thing we can all agree on, it is THE HEALING POWER OF NAPS. As Sarah Maria Griffin put it, “Is napping not just horizontal walking?”

Before she settled on being an author, Krystal Sutherland wanted to be an actress: “I had this grand plan that Peter Jackson was going to get a flat tyre outside my house and discover me…”

There were plenty of podcast recommendations, which is interesting because just last week I devoted a whole post to re-imagining YA books as podcasts… 

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image courtesy @Dept51

Katherine Webber can apparently quote the entirety of Clueless, and can definitely quote the first three minutes. We probably would have been treated to a live reading if there weren’t time constraints on a top-notch panel alongside Lauren James, Holly Bourne, Cat Doyle and Anna James.

We can never look at garden gnomes the same way again, thanks to Cat Doyle and her deviant ex… (Other topics of conversation on that panel included writing female characters and romance in YA.)

The panellists were ruthless when it came to David Stevens’ moderation, as Sheena Wilkinson, Meg Grehan, Sara Barnard and Estelle Maskame chatted responses to characters, fandom, fan-fiction (“It was one time!”), genre, and how “bad choices make good stories.”

If Meg Grehan’s book The Space Between was a kitchen utensil, it would be a ladle…? 

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image courtesy @Dept51

“MAKE GOOD CHOICES, DECLAN!” became one of my favourite slogans of the weekend thanks to Deirdre Sullivan, who is a rare combination of hilarious panel guest and enthusiastic chair (the moderating position, not the piece of furniture) and also she knits very cute hats.

It was Pooja Puri’s first-ever panel, and she got a round of applause for finishing her dissertation!

Whether or not one writes to music was a popular topic and came up on multiple panels; it was addressed by authors including Lydia Ruffles, who listens to songs and lights candles to get in the writing zone, and YA Book Prize winner Patrice Lawrence.

Sally Nicholls “is so here for gay suffragettes!” but had to do quite a lot of research as she is so here for it, in fact, that she wrote an entire book about it.

The eternal struggle of the DeptCon audience: sit near the front for best view (Facial expressions! Secrets boxes!) or near the back to get out first for the post-panel signing (Chat! Shorter queues!)…?

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image courtesy @Dept51

SARAAAAHHHHHH. Hang on, wait, that’s not an answer. Okay, so Sarah, who is English but recently defected to Scotland along with her new fringe, made her first trip to DeptCon this year AND IT WAS GREAT. She made for a fab convention co-conspirator. There may have been singalongs. She and I are fairly seasoned book event people, so instead of participating in the ARC drop I played with a dog and she spent her time on a chocolate muffin #priorities Also I learned actual facts, such as that Gàidhlig (Scottish or Scots Gaelic), is pronounced ‘Gallic’, like the French term, as opposed to the Irish Gaelic or Gaeilge. 

Hayley Barker’s time as a teacher influenced her writing of YA. In a panel that was often focused on writing as a process and a craft, it was generally agreed that YA can act as a safe space for teenagers to explore serious issues.

Anna Day’s book The Fandom isn’t out until January, but she still got to do at least one signing – because I had a coveted review copy with me!

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image courtesy @Dept51

The panel unofficially known as ‘Prosecco and Secrets’, Melinda Salisbury, Cat Doyle, Alice Broadway, Dave Rudden and Moira Fowley-Doyle, was raucous and totally salacious. If this quintet held a dinner party, just some of their guests would include Lyra from His Dark Materials, Death from Discworld, and Sirius Black because Mel wants to sleep with him (“I bought a pair of rams’ horns… for personal reasons… ask Sirius Black if you want to know more!”)

As every Irish person knows, it was reiterated that you should never piss off the fairies. This involved sharing many fairy anecdotes, such as clapping twice after sneezing so a fairy won’t die and mistaking the light of illegal poitín stills on bogs for otherworldly creatures. As Moira Fowley-Doyle put it: “Growing up in Ireland, you’re super sceptical and willing to believe at the same time…” Melinda Salisbury countered with “In England you wouldn’t speak to anyone on the bus, let alone to the fairies” but noted that when she went to the Isle of Man, the announcements on her bus greeted a fairy bridge…

Things got a bit existential when Fowley-Doyle wondered if, rather than fantasy folks being bad at reality, “Maybe reality’s just not very good at us?”

The otherwise brilliant Holly Bourne can’t spell Dobby. She may never live this down. (The Harry Potter Spelling Bee, won by Emily Barr, was a really entertaining addition to the schedule, and it worked really well to break up the panels – more like this, please!)

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image couresty @Dept51

Bonus: there was a giant, portable My Little Pony there for the whole weekend, and nobody questioned it…

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Books To Read In Autumn

We’re well and truly on the way to autumn, so today on the blog, I thought I’d look at some of my favourite books to recommend in autumn! Rather than going for a theme like 2017 autumn/winter books or curriculum-assigned reading, I’ve chosen books that feel autumnal to me, whether through style or content (eerie fantasy, say, rather than beachside contemporary) or simply being a sensory reader (it’s definitely a thing!).

27281393The Sleeping Prince by Melinda Salisbury

So maybe it’s a little unorthodox to start a recommendation list with the second book in a trilogy, but hear me out. The Sin Eater trilogy is solid UKYA, but for me the eerie, folk-tale touches to The Sleeping Prince marked the point where Salisbury really began to flex what she could do in terms of voice, villains and style. The titular Sleeping Prince is a chilling, semi-undead creation, a kind of Pied-Piper-meets-Sleeping-Beauty mash-up, and probably one of the best (or should that be worst?) villains I’ve read of late (there’s lots more about the books in my reviews here). There’s also a strain of the book that includes what seems suspiciously like lycanthropy. Moreover, this  is a book which just feels autumnal to me: like cold stone, crunched leaves, ginger biscuits (don’t ask), air with just a little drizzle in it, discovering the art of alchemy isn’t lost after all, etc.

23592175The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge

This one isn’t so much for the book’s weather as its spooky, surprisingly dark feel. I’d heard a lot of praise for The Lie Tree before I read it, but somehow didn’t expect it to be such a distinct historical thriller – it’s smart, thematic and has splashes of the otherworldly (not least in the much-lauded quality of the writing), but it’s most certainly a historical mystery. Set in Victorian England, it follows fourteen-year-old Faith Sanderly in a complex mix of problem-solving, gothic twists and frustration at gender roles (there’s even a rebuke of the ‘not like other girls’ trope: “Faith had always told herself that she was not like other ladies. But neither, it seemed, were other ladies”). Of course, everyone else has already hyped it enough before me!, but it’s a top recommendations out there for that border between upper children’s and young adult fiction.

35688988Tangleweed and Brine by Deirdre Sullivan

This collection of (bear with me) twelve feminist fairytale retelling short stories was released just a few weeks ago from Little Island Books and is ideal autumnal reading. Witchy, subversive and lyrical, it’s fairly dark but is another top-notch addition to the fabulous Deirdre Sullivan’s back catalogue, and a particularly unique addition to this year’s Irish YA. If you liked Amanda Lovelace’s The Princess Saves Herself In This One or are intrigued by Louise O’Neill’s upcoming Little Mermaid retelling The Surfaces Breaks, this should tide you over (additionally, the cover looks fabulous surrounded by ivy and potion ingredients flowers). You can read more about Sullivan’s books, and others like it, here. 

16068905Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

All my recommendation so far have been a bit on the dark or at least slightly fantastical side, so I’ve gone for something a little lighter and more down-to-earth here. Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl is a gorgeous, unhurried, almost cosy contemporary, which begins during protagonist Cath’s first semester (think falling leaves, darkening weather, cute sweaters) at college. It’s warm as a well-worn scarf and sharp as a pair of six-inch stilettos, and though it’s been out for a couple of years, it’s still one of the best portrayals of fandom I’ve seen in YA. If you haven’t made time for Cath, Reagan and Levi (oh, Levi) in your contemporary reading, this is one you need to add to your list.

29080992Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens

The Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries are one of those series you know is relatively recent but which seems like it’s been around for ages. It has that classic but accessible touch which makes it appealing to kids and brings something older readers or adults can appreciate, too. The quintessential English boarding school setting – where pupils call teachers ‘mistresses’ and ‘masters’, learn Latin and get up to hijinks – fits autumn, but added adventures, mysteries and a historical time period make it stand out. The storytelling style plays on the Sherlock Holmes and John Watson dichotomy, with narrator Hazel relaying events in her notebook while partner-in-crime (solving) runs headfirst into trouble. Cacklingly funny as well as cleverly written (who doesn’t want an excuse to use words like ‘dashing’ and ‘canoodling’ more often?!) the first book in the series, which opens in October 1934, is worth opening up if you haven’t tried it yet.

23346358The Accident Season by Moïra Fowley-Doyle

If there’s any recent YA book that’s ideal for reading and re-reading every autumn, it’s Moïra Fowley-Doyle’s The Accident Season. Come October, seventeen-year-old Cara and her family – including her mother, older sister and ex-stepbrother – board up the windows and hide the sharp implements in preparation for the Accident Season, a month in which mysterious and dangerous things seem to constantly befall them. A spellbinding magical realism standalone, it’s full of tarot cards, masquerade balls, fortune-telling, dreams, hallucinations and hazy, stylish prose. If you’re looking for an atmospheric autumnal read, this is absolutely the book to go for. Fowley-Doyle’s other book, Spellbook of the Lost and Found, is set during summer, but it does have a bonfire, and is totally worth picking up too – it’s definitely one of my go-to book-pushing reads of the year!

What will you be reading this autumn? Have you read any of the books on this list? Chat below or on Twitter!

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Street Song by Sheena Wilkinson // rags-to-riches-to-rags-again

34111364Author(s): Sheena Wilkinson 
Publisher:
 Black & White Publishing
Publication date: 20th April 2017
Category: YA
Genre(s): contemporary
Series or standalone?: standalone
Source: I received a Netgalley copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
Find on Goodreads and The Book Depository

After winning a glitzy TV talent show and becoming a teen pop sensation – under the particularly embarrassing stage name ‘RyLee’ – eighteen-year-old Ryan’s life has spiralled into addiction, media scrutiny, rehab and a floundering career. 

His stepdad, self-appointed architect of the RyLee brand, wants him in school, and under his thumb. But when their arguments reach boiling point, Ryan finds himself fleeing his old life, his failed career, and his dysfunctional family. When he meets witty guitar-player Toni, the opportunity to start fresh seems too good to pass up. Before long, he’s arrived in a new city, joined Toni’s band, and reinvented himself. But has he really outrun his past? And what kind of future can there be for a washed-up has-been with secrets to keep?

One of a string of 2017 titles from Scotland’s newest YA imprint – including a recent contemporary from Did I Mention I Love You author Estelle Maskame and hot-topic début The Jungle by Pooja Puri – Street Song is the latest standalone from Northern Irish writer Sheena Wilkinson. One of Ink Road Books’ more experienced early signings, I interviewed Sheena on the blog last year as part of UKYACX (and even got a glimpse into the book that would become Street Song). The resulting book isn’t a million miles from what I expected then, as Wilkinson, true to form, takes a tough but vigorous look at contemporary Belfast through the eyes of a teenager.

The premise of the book is remarkably reminiscent of Keren David’s latest UKYA effort, Cuckoo (you can read my review here): teen boy deals with fame, family breakdown, hostile relationships, and a career on a downward spiral as he is finds himself homeless and struggling to make a living, meeting an unlikely handful of both helpful and shady characters along the way. A few key features – acting is replaced with music, an experimental style is replaced with more predictable form – mean that they read just differently enough, though if you’re looking for something completely original, you won’t find it here.

In trying to outrun his fortune-hungry family, one-time teen star Ryan winds up running into cool, plucky musician Toni. She doesn’t recognise him from his cringe-worthy days on reality television, but she does recognise his musical ability. He needs a place to stay, she needs a decent guitarist for her band, and so the unlikely pair embark on a rocky road lined with musical jams, setbacks, mistakes, and the possibility of romance. He may be living in a hostel and be busking for his bread, but for the first time in his life Ryan is playing the music he’s always wanted to play.

Throw in no-nonsense Polish bass player Marysia, some work-in-progress song lyrics, Billy the cat, and a handful of solid but by no means iconic characters – I particularly like Toni’s pragmatic but supportive mother – and Wilkinson creates a novel which is at its best when caught up in the joys of music and the unrivalled potential of a band’s early days. While I found the idea that Ryan would agree to enter a battle of bands – Backlash – a bit surprising given his belligerent history with music competitions, it’s a standard plot device for a rags-to-riches (or in this case rags-to-riches-to-rags-again) tale.

Page-turning and surprisingly absorbing, Street Song is a relatively quick read which balances the unpredictability of busking on the streets, with its good takings, bad takings, inclement weather and cityscape feel with interesting character dynamics, driven plot and a vibrant musical thread. Ryan’s struggles with manufactured identity, addiction, and the fallout from fifteen minutes of fame take up much of the book, but I was most intrigued by Toni and Marysia. I really liked their friendship and would’ve liked to have seen even more of it. I’d almost go as far as to say I’d read a sequel to this book, if only to see where the choppy waters of music and relationships take the headline trio.

Street Song is one of those strange books that seems both gritty and occasionally glossed over, as the backdrop of a protagonist living hand-to-mouth amid some dodgy characters is met with an oddly-paced narrative in which the worst happens to others before being essentially brushed aside, and the fact that the audience is aware that Ryan is keeping a secret a luxurious existence he left behind, the likes of which working-class Toni and Marysia hardly dare dream of. I’d definitely recommend a trigger warning for serious content which appears to heighten tension and then seems almost forgotten about. RyLee’s fans, primarily women and girls, are referred to as ‘RyLeens’ and are usually dismissed or treated with dismay, so if you’re looking for more positive portrayals of teenagers and fandom, you’re better off with Sophia Bennett’s Love Song or Maggie Harcourt’s Unconventional – and I’m still waiting for a classic piece of girlband-focused fiction from contemporary YA.

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An interesting, if gritty, take on fame and misfortune from one of Northern Ireland’s most notable YA writers. For fans of Keren David’s Cuckoo, Katie Everson’s Drop and Leila Sales’ This Song Will Save Your Life. 

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YA I’d Like To See: Irish YA Edition (with bonus gifs!)

Today on the blog, I talk the kind of books I’d like to see from Irish YA! If you’re looking for recommendations from the existing selection, I have just the post from earlier this year. You may also have seen my ‘YA I’d  Like To See: Historical Fiction’ post last autumn, but if not, you can check it out here.

If Ireland has a YA ‘scene’ (that is, consistent new releases and a recognisable sense of community among readers) it’s relatively new – some estimates might even frame it as a twenty-first century phenomenon, though teen fiction for Irish teenagers has been around longer. Either way Irish YA is still in its early years: there are milestones it hasn’t reached, genres it hasn’t mastered, breakthroughs it hasn’t awoken to yet. This can be frustrating when you’re faced with a shelf full of books you’ve already thumbed through (seriously, I pity anyone who’s reading schedule depends on Irish YA alone, ’cause it would be SPARSE), but it does leave room for potential. So what would I like to see from Irish YA? Well…

First up: badass teen girl characters. Badass female characters are a high priority in all of my books-I-want-to-see posts. YA is a medium where teen girl characters, like real teen girls, can be as complex, active, flawed, fully-rounded people. As the same can’t be said for other types of media, the least YA can do is strive to provide a space where the interests of enthusiastic, smart, varied teen girls are valued and celebrated.

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More inclusive contemporaries. Contemporary is one of Irish YA’s go-to genres, but it would be cool  to see it include more diversity of perspective and experience! This could be incidental – where a character happens to be black, for example, because black people exist too, to paraphrase Amandla Stenberg – or more central to the plot – as with Peadar O’Guilín’s The Call, which is a horror novel but whose protagonist Nessa is both kickass and a disabled survivor of polio. Books like The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon and When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon have rocketed through the blogosphere (and the NYT bestseller list). Books by UKYA BAME authors (try saying that ten times fast) have been all over awards like the YA Book Prize, the Costa and the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize. Irish publishers might be missing a trick here.

Slick, cinematic genre additions. I’m talking out-there, eye-catching concepts. Catherine Doyle’s dark, action packed Mafia trilogy, full of feuds, fisticuffs and forbidden love is a memorable example, and it even busts some of the stereotypes it embraces. Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl remains a brilliant, wise-cracking sci-fi fantasy. Bombastic, confident genre pieces are a mainstay of MG – why not YA, too?

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Contemporary travel. YA where teens travel, explore, live abroad or look for a summer fling has had enduring appeal, not least in Stephanie Perkins’ near-perfect Anna and the French Kiss. It can be totally cheesy, but even Irish YA taking on a more international vibe – including challenges, obstacles, homesickness – would be awesome.

Books with a stylistic twist. Verse novels, non-linear narration, interesting typography, mixed epistolary formats with texts and emails and postcards and illustrations. Meg Grehan’s verse novel The Space Between is a good example of this in recent Irish YA, while Deirdre Sullivan’s collection of dark feminist fairytales Tangleweed and Brine is also one to keep an eye on. I WANT MORE OF THEM.

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Magic. Okay, so this has been done before. But there are so many possibilities with magical realism, mythology, portal fantasy, fairies, witchiness – whether that’s Irish-set or with expanded horizons. It’s a difficult genre to pull off, but when it’s good it’s fabul- oh, screw it, this is just me asking for more Moïra Fowley-Doyle books, isn’t it?

More complicated, fandom-worthy high fantasy. Fantasy is one of YA’s shining achievements. So many recent fantasy titles have been huge hits – Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas, The Wrath and the Dawn by Reneé Ahdieh, Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor, Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake, I could go on – and I’d love to see a fresh Irish-penned series up there with the best of them. I want to fangirl over plot twists and eagerly await new installments! I want to overuse capslock in reviews and get invested in fandom theories! I want to be this gif of Joey from FRIENDS about it, basically.

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Less… I’m usually hesitant to include ‘less of’ in posts like this, because I’m a firm believer in trying to expand, rather than narrow, the vocal range of YA. But I will say that less historical fiction and less dystopia would be great, as Irish historical fiction is quite oversaturated (and dare I say it, predictable) while dystopia as a trend just doesn’t appeal to teens anymore. If you want readers to sit up and take notice, you have to be bringing something brilliant or new to the table.

Better covers. I struggle to think of an Irish teen fiction cover that’s really blown me away of late. The Space Between comes close, or maybe Sarah Crossan’s books, but still. Covers make or break a book, you guys, and there’s nothing worse than an underwhelming one. Bright colours, polished graphic design, striking typography, illustrations that make you do a double take – they’re SO important, I actually wrote an entire post about it. Irish YA needs to step up its game here.

MORE HAPPINESS. As much as I do my best to support and talk about it, the tone of Irish YA can be a bit of a miseryfest? I think it’s because seriousness sells – it’s literary, it’s what publishers are familiar with, it’s award-worthy, it comes with a handy list of default adjectives like ‘shocking’ and ‘important’. But it does a disservice to teens and readers, because we also deserve books that are optimistic and relevant and complicated. The teenagers I know are – hold onto your hats – complex, funny, messy, capable, proactive, ridiculous, even, dare I say it, occasionally happy. What’s more, it’s really tricky to write books which are warm or hopeful and heartbreaking and thematic (see Jandy Nelson, Sara Barnard, Clare Furniss, David Levithan, Emery Lord, Lisa Williamson), and perhaps even harder to write books which are laugh-out-loud funny. I’d like to see Irish YA challenging itself to bringing a little more light to teenage books.

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What about you? What are your favourite books by Irish authors? What would you like to see more of in YA?

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